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Max Müller – Another free thinker held back by creeps

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English: Photograph of Max Muller as a young man

Photograph of Max Muller as a young man (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Max Müller (1823-1900) was a German born Indologist who is often credited with creating the disciplines of Indian Studies and Comparative Religion. His Sacred Books of the East is downloadable and can probably still be found in most major libraries, in the archives if not circulating.

Muller was a freethinking Lutheran and the religious conservatives of his day hampered his career advancement.¹ He believed that Hinduism needed an update, much like Christianity underwent its protestant reformation. For Müller, the ideal Hindu would jettison what he saw as “superstition” and be Christian-like but neither Anglican nor Catholic. In other words, Müller wanted to get to the core of what makes religion great, getting rid of all the cultural constructions that make it pedantic.

I can certainly relate to this view, having converted to Catholicism after a non-churchgoing childhood and young adulthood. From that perspective, sometimes the rituals and expectations seem arbitrary, even superficial.

But at the same time, most of us need some kind of structure. The question is how much structure helps and how much hinders in serving God. And this differs from person to person.

Debate between Catholics and Oriental Christia...

Debate between Catholics and Oriental Christians in the 13th century, Acre 1290. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What is really tiring is when-well meaning but narrow-minded Catholic acquaintances start preaching to me what I should be doing, how I should be approaching Catholicism.

Funny thing is, they usually pick and choose what rules and regulations work for them, ignoring the others. But at the same time, they get some kind of self-righteous pleasure out of telling me which rules and regs I should abide by!

It’s pretty hard to take people like this too seriously. They may mean well but clearly have not integrated their consciousness to a level of maturity that, I think, the future demands. I always feel like I’m dealing with psychological children when talking with them. True, Jesus said we should be like little children to enter the kingdom of heaven. But I think he was talking about being childlike in love and wonder, and not childish in hypocrisy.²

¹ Today, I think it’s more institutional corruption that hinders career advancement—at least in Canadian academia and in the Catholic Church. I’m not sure about the US and beyond. But petty differences in belief along with personal likes and dislikes could also play a role in career sabotage.

² It seems that some folks get a new social identity by playing the role of “saint,” “victim soul” or “missionary.” I think in reality there’s almost always a combination of unresolved psychological material and genuine religious experience. And anyone who claims otherwise probably could benefit from looking into whichever end of the psychological-spiritual spectrum they are ignoring.

Related » Veda, Vedanta

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