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The Son, Catholicism and its Critics

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English: child Jesus with the virgin Mary, wit...

Child Jesus with the virgin Mary, with the Holy Spirit (represented as a dove) and God the Father, with child john the Baptist and saint Elizabeth on the right (Wikipedia)

In Christian theology, the Son is part of the Holy Trinity. The Christian Trinity refers to the belief that God, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit form a co-equal, co-eternal mystical union.

Jesus, the Son, is fully human and fully divine. Not a few alternative Christianities claim or have claimed that Jesus wasn’t fully human or, alternately, that he wasn’t fully divine. These views were aggressively branded as “heresies” by the early Church Fathers, most notably Tertullian, a presbyter from Carthage (a Roman province in occupied Africa), and Irenaeus, the Bishop of the Roman occupied Gaul (what is now Lyon, France). These two men expended a great deal of energy denouncing anyone who didn’t see things the way they did.

Concerning the orthodox version of the Trinity, so vigorously proclaimed in the early Church, each of the three parts is defined as a “person.” It remains somewhat mysterious as to just what this means.¹

Another issue with the idea of the “Son” as part of the Trinity is its supremely masculine character. Many feminist writers have taken issue with this, forwarding notions of “The Goddess” to counterbalance what they argue is nothing more than an unsavory remnant of patriarchal oppression.

Some Christian theologians counter that God is beyond gender, a position outlined in the Roman Catholic catechism. But to many, this still falls short.

The depth psychologist Carl Jung believed that the Catholic dogma of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (1950) was a step in the right direction. Jung believed that Catholicism trumped Protestantism in this area because it was promoting much needed feminine symbols to communicate the numinous. But again, to many feminists, calling Jesus’ mother Mary the “greatest saint” or “Mother of God” does not compare to her son’s status as “God.”

The discussion here can get complicated, and I don’t pretend to have any answers, myself. It’s probably most productive to remember that God is a mystery. The mysterious aspect of God is something which, again, the Catholic authorities do recognize.

Some critique Catholic notables who believe they are divinely inspired or, at least, in a privileged position to make firm, even cutting, statements on pressing issues.² The more forceful critics say that worldly power has gone to their heads, and they lampoon the notion that Catholic authorities have a pipeline to God.

From a sociological perspective, it’s also worthy to note that because Catholic authorities belong to a group which enjoys social power, the current version of psychiatry does not designate them as mentally unsound. But if it were an individual saying “I know what God wants,” most, if not all, psychiatrists would probably see this as a mental disorder and possibly prescribe medication to dampen down their “delusions” or “magical thinking.”

History reveals that the individual is often persecuted. And some believe that today’s conventional Church in some ways carries on that tradition of insulting, bullying and marginalizing people who are different. This claim is ironic considering that Jesus, the individual, was persecuted within a similar dynamic.

¹ Wikipedia outlines the standard theological wording, but it doesn’t really help much. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinity

² Recall the Pope recently saying that Donald Trump is “not Christian.”

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